Southeast corner of the government office

This part was the southeast corner of the government office. It is approximately 77 m from the restored northeast corner. The mud wall delimiting the government office to the south was inspected during a state survey in 1962, but it was later discovered that this had been the southeast corner of the government office when a curve to the north was discovered in that wall in 1985. The pink part in the top left figure on the explanation board is the remains of the mud wall. This place is in the bottom right corner. The green on the same map is the remains of the east gate, the ocher is the remains of a pit dwelling, and the light blue is where the state survey was conducted in 1962. The ditch dug during the state survey showed that the mud wall stood on an embankment approximately 1.5 m thick and then approximately 2 m thick on the south side. This was likely achieved through large-scale leveling of the south slope to ensure sufficient space for the government office (the two top photos on the right side of the explanation board show the remains of the mud wall, while the photo in the middle shows the depth of the embankment).
Pit dwelling: The bottom photo on the right side of the explanation board shows the remains of a pit dwelling (below the figure’s ocher part). Excavated earthenware suggests that it was residential and built in the first half of the eighth century, which was before the building of Akita Fort. Since the soil that buried the dwelling is the same soil that was used to make the embankment, it was likely buried when the government office was built.